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September 17th, 2014

iPhone_Sep15_AFor many Apple fans, September 9 was a big day; possibly the biggest day of the year. This was the day Apple announced not only new iPhones, but also a new smartwatch and some interesting changes to the upcoming update to iOS 8. If you missed the news then here is a quick overview of the announcements made by Apple.

The iPhone 6

Before the September 9 event, rumors were flying for months about a new iPhone that Apple was working on. The company did not disappoint and announced a new version of their staggeringly popular phone. Here's an overview of the iPhone 6 specs which business owners and managers will want to know about.
  • Screen: The iPhone 6 will have a 4.7 inch screen (measured diagonally), and will sport Apple's new display, Retina HD, which has more pixels for a much improved image quality.
  • Size: The phone will be 5.44 x 2.64 inches and .27 inches thick. The device's shape has also been changed slightly with a more rounded body (compared to the iPhone 5's squared body) which should make it easier to hold.
  • Processor: This device will have what Apple calls the A8 processor. This is an improved processor over the one found in previous devices like the iPhone 5, and offers 25% faster speeds and 50% better efficiency. In other words, the device will be able to do more than previous versions, and do it faster.
  • Storage: You can choose either 16GB, 64GB, or 128GB of storage space.
  • Battery life: Apple has noted that the iPhone 6 should have the same, or slightly better, battery life than previous models. While this may not seem like an improvement, you need to take into account the bigger screen which requires more power to run.
  • Pricing: In the US, the iPhone 6 starts at USD 199 for the 16GB of storage. It should be noted that this is the price on a two year contract. If you want to purchase the model outright, prices start at USD 649 for the 16GB. Both the on-contract and outright purchase prices go up USD 100 for each increase in storage.
  • Availability: You could pre-order your device starting September 12, with it being available in many stores September 19. Chances are, the device will sell out quickly, so you may be put on a waiting list if you decide to purchase right away.

The iPhone 6 Plus

Alongside rumors about the impending iPhone 6, there were also rumors that Apple would be introducing a larger version of the iPhone 6 that is designed to compete with the various "phablets" (small tablets with phone capabilities) which are immensely popular these days. They did indeed announce a new, larger version of the iPhone 6 called the iPhone 6 Plus. Here is an overview of the major details that will benefit business owners and managers.
  • Screen: The iPhone 6 Plus will have a 5.5 inch screen (measured diagonally), and will sport Apple's new display, Retina HD, which has more pixels, meaning image quality will be much improved.
  • Size: The phone will be 6.22 x 3.06 inches and .28 inches thick. The device's shape has also been changed slightly with a more rounded body. It may take time to get used to the screen size and some users may not be able to use the device comfortably with one hand.
  • Processor: This device will have what Apple calls the A8 processor. This is an improved processor over the one found in previous devices like the iPhone 5, and offers 25% faster speeds and 50% better efficiency. In other words, the device will be able to do more, faster, than previous versions.
  • Storage: You can choose either 16GB, 64GB, or 128GB of storage space.
  • Battery life: Apple has noted that the iPhone 6 Plus will have a larger battery that supposedly offers 24 hours of talk time. Because this device hasn't been fully tested yet, it's difficult to tell what the actual battery life will be like, but it will likely be enough to get you through a day of moderate use.
  • Pricing: In the US, the iPhone 6 Plus starts at USD 299 for the 16GB of storage. It should be noted that this is the price if you get the device on a two year contract. If you want to purchase it outright, the device starts at USD 749 for the 16GB. Both the on-contract and outright prices go up USD 100 for each increase in storage.
  • Availability: Pre-orders for the device started September 12, but it was quickly sold out. Apple has noted that it should be in many stores as of September 19.

The Apple Watch

Apple wasn't done with just two mobile devices however, they also proved rumors true and announced a new device - the Apple Watch. This is Apple's take on the smartwatch that appears to be gaining traction with many users.

The Apple Watch is a rectangular device that is worn on the wrist and, as the name implies, is a watch. Well, a watch with numerous features that many users will no doubt enjoy. The device has a knob at the top-left which Apple calls the "digital crown", that you use to navigate the device. For example, pressing it opens the device's home screen, while turning it will zoom the face.

You can also interact the device via touch. For example, you will be able to swipe up from the bottom of the screen to open a feature Apple calls Glance. This provides you with useful information like the date, weather, notifications, etc.

Because typing on a device that is on your wrist is pretty much impossible to do accurately, the device supports voice commands and even interaction with Siri. The Apple Watch also has a multitude of sensors including health related ones like a heart rate sensor.

So far, it appears like this device is mainly aimed towards individual users, but business users who are looking for a way to interact with their devices or a different way to keep track of their most important information like calendars, etc. may find it useful too.

If the watch sounds interesting, you are going to have to wait for a while, as Apple has said it won't be released until the spring of 2015. While this may seem like a long time to wait, it could prove to be positive, as it gives the company more time to perfect the device. When released, Apple has noted that the Apple Watch will start at USD 350.

New iOS 8 features

New devices weren't all that was introduced at the event, Apple also talked about some new features that will be introduced in iOS 8.
  • Near Field Communication (NFC) and ApplePay - Both the new iPhone 6s and the Apple Watch will ship with NFC chips in the device. These can be used in conjunction with Apple's new pay service, ApplePay. Like other similar apps, you will be able to use your phone as a wallet, and swipe it over pay terminals to pay for items. Your payment information is stored in Passbook which creates a unique ID for each credit card, but does not store your credit card information.
  • Enhanced navigation - With bigger screens on both of the new iPhones, many users will want to hold the phone in landscape (horizontal) mode for easier viewing of apps. iOS 8 will enable this.
  • New gesture - Reachability - Reachability is a new gesture that will allow users to quickly switch the content at the top of the screen by tapping twice on the Home button.
For those of you who have an existing iPhone or iPad, you should have been asked to upgrade to iOS 8 when it came out September 17.

If you are looking to learn more about the iPhone 6, 6 Plus, Apple Watch, or iOS 8, contact us today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic iPhone
September 16th, 2014

Facebook_Sep18_AAs of the first quarter of 2014, Facebook has 1.28 billion active users (users who log in at least once a month). With around a fifth of the world's population using the service, you can bet that it is a target for spammers and hackers. If you use Facebook on a regular basis, there is a good chance that you have seen some suspicious or outright blatant spam links. Clicking on these could lead to sites that are set up to steal information so it is a good idea to be aware of the five most common spam and malware posts on this social media platform.

1. Statistics on Profile visits

Spend enough time on Facebook and you will likely see this type of post on your Timeline. The post usually shows itself off as an app that allows users to see who has been viewing their personal profile, or the statistics related to profile views. There is also a link to click to either go to a site or install an app.

These posts look legitimate, but Facebook doesn't actually allow these apps, so clicking on them usually leads to malicious apps or sites. As some of these posts contain links to Facebook apps, you will be asked to allow the app permissions like access to personal data, friends lists, etc. These apps won't work, but they do give the developer access to your information which could then be used to start other malicious hacks.

2. Changing the color of your Profile

With the wide number of apps, devices, and other tech available to us, developers are often keen to offer users the ability to customize how their app looks. For example you may have applied your own themes or changed icons with your browser. Therefore, it makes sense that some users might want to change the color of their Facebook Profile from the standard blue that everyone uses.

There are apps out there that supposedly allow you to do this. However, Facebook doesn't allow users to customize the color of their Profile - it's blue for everyone. Therefore, the apps and links that supposedly allow you to change the color are fake and likely related to spam or malicious content. It's best to not click on the links in these posts, or install apps that say they allow you to do this customization.

3. Check if a friend has deleted/unfriended you

This post seems to come up every six months or so on Facebook. Like the statistics on Profile visits, apps claiming to allow you to check if you have been unfriended are fake. The biggest giveaway that this is a fake app or post is the wording. When someone doesn't want to be connected with you on Facebook, they will 'unfriend' you, not 'delete' you as these posts often claim. Needless to say, it is best to refrain from clicking on these links and apps.

4. Free stuff from Facebook

If you are a Facebook fan then you might like a free Facebook t-shirt, hat, water bottle, etc. There is a known post that shows up from time-to-time declaring that Facebook is giving away free stuff, and that if you click on the link in the post you too can get hold of some freebies.

Facebook does not usually give away stuff via network posts. Those people you see walking around with Facebook apparel usually either work for the company, had it printed themselves, or attended a Facebook event. Therefore, if you see these posts, don't click on the link.

5. Revealing pics or videos of celebrities

With all the recent leaks of celebrity photos and videos, you can be sure that the number of posts popping up on you News Feed with links to these types images and videos will become increasingly popular.

Not only is this obscene, the posts are 100% fake. Clicking on any of the links will likely take you to a site with 'files' that you need to download. The issue is, these files are actually malware and can pose a serious security risk.

As a general rule of thumb: Don't click on any links in posts connected to celebrities and revealing images or videos.

What can I do about these posts?

These tips are mainly for individual Facebook users as this is whom hackers and spammers are targeting the most. How is this an issue for your business? Well, if an employee is browsing Facebook at work and clicks on one of the links in posts like the ones above, there is a good chance they could introduce malware into your systems and networks.

Therefore, you might want to educate your employees about common Facebook security threats like the ones above. Beyond this, you should encourage everyone to take the following steps when they do come across content like this:

  1. Click the grey arrow at the top-right of the post.
  2. Select I don't want to see this.
  3. Click Report this Post.
This will ensure that the post itself is deleted and that the content is reported to Facebook for followup. Usually, if there are enough reports, Facebook will look into the content and likely ban the user.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 11th, 2014

MobileGeneral_Sep08_AWhen you go to upgrade your phone you may consider selling your old one. However, one issue you may face is having a number of apps on your device that contain personal information. You need to take care that you deauthenticate apps when you're considering getting rid of, or selling your upgraded devices. The next question is which apps should you be looking out for?

What exactly is deauthentication?

Some apps, although not all, require that you authenticate your device in order for them to work. Many developers who ask users to authenticate their device do so in order to either prevent copies of the software from being created and utilized, or to ensure that the device and app can communicate securely.

Some examples of apps that ask for authentication include those that use multi-factor authentication, password managers, and apps that require a subscription or credit card information, etc. On some devices you even need to enter a code or key, much like installing software on a new computer, in order to activate all the features of the app.

The main reason many developers require authentication is connected to security. As security is becoming an ever more pressing issue, there is a good chance that we will see more apps asking users to authenticate their devices in the future.

The issue with this is that when you go to sell your device you will likely need to purchase the app again or the buyer of the device won't be able to set up their own account.

Common apps you should deauthenticate

Apps with subscription services: This includes apps like Google Play Music, Spotify, Office for iPad, cloud storage apps that you have linked your device to, etc. These apps are usually either linked with your device or your phone number so it is a good idea to deauthenticate them.
  1. Kindle app: The Kindle app is actually linked to your device and users who want to use the app will likely not be able to if the device is linked to your account. You can unlink devices by going to the Amazon site, logging in and selecting Manage your Content and Devices when you hover over your account name.
  2. Password management apps: These apps usually require that you authenticate your device to use a particular service. If you try to log in on a new device, these apps may not work properly.
  3. Chat apps: Some chat apps like WhatsApp or Line require that you register for the service using your phone number. If you are keeping your number, you shouldn't have to deauthenticate, but if you are getting a new number, you should go into the account settings of each app and unlink your number. WhatsApp for example has a feature that allows you to move your number to a new device.
  4. Any app or service that you have linked credit card information to: While you ordinarily don't have to physically deauthenticate these apps, as the information is usually linked to an account and password, it is a good idea to unlink your credit card with any app on your phone before you hand it over. This will help ensure that credit card information is not stored or accessible.
When it comes to the major app stores, e.g., Windows Phone Store, Google Play, and iTunes, you will often see that your device has been linked to your account. If you are going to sell your device, the best course of action is to reset using the factory reset option. This will delete all data and installed apps on the device. This will often be enough to deauthenticate all apps.

If you are looking to learn more about getting rid of your older devices, contact us today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 10th, 2014

iPad_Seo08_AEarlier this year, software giant Microsoft released iPad specific Office apps, which many iPad users have been eagerly awaiting. While these apps bring full-versions of the four most popular Office programs to the iPad, you do need an Office 365 account in order to get the most out of them. Microsoft has also recently updated the Office for iPad apps, introducing in-app subscriptions.

Looking at the recent subscription update

When the iPad versions of the Office apps were released, users could download the apps for free but needed an Office 365 subscription in order to use the full features of the apps. Those who didn't have a subscription were limited to only being able to read and print Office documents, and present using PowerPoint.

Those who wanted to use all the features of the app needed to sign up for an Office 365 account. In order to do this, they had to physically go to the Office 365 site and sign up. They couldn't sign up via the app. While this process isn't overly taxing, it did cause some frustration for some users.

To remedy this, Microsoft has recently announced that users will now be able to sign up for an Office 365 subscription directly from the app. According to an article posted on the Microsoft Office blog, "Starting today [September 2, 2014], you can buy a monthly subscription to Office 365 from within Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint for iPad."

The subscriptions you can purchase

While Microsoft has noted that you can purchase an Office 365 subscription in-app, you should be aware that the subscriptions are monthly and for the Home or Personal versions of Office 365.

A monthly Office 365 Home subscription costs USD$9.99 a month and can be used on one iPad and up to five PCs or Macs, while an Office 365 Personal plan costs USD$6.99 a month and can be installed on on iPad and one PC or Mac.

What about business users?

For the time being, users can only subscribe to individual Office 365 accounts via the app. If your business has an Office 365 for Business subscription e.g., Office 365 Small Business Premium, etc, you should be able to access the full-version of the iPad app without having to sign up for a Personal or Home subscription, just log in using the same username and password you use to sign into Office 365.

If you don't have an Office 365 subscription, then it may be a good idea to get in touch with us to learn more about Office 365 business plans and how they can be successfully implemented into your business.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic iPad
September 5th, 2014

HealthcareIT_Sep03_A

As of June 30, 2014, more than 1,000 data breaches affecting more than 500 patients each have been reported to the Department of Health & Human Services - for a total of roughly 32,000,000 people who have had their privacy compromised. And, according to the annual Redspin Breach Report, published in February of 2014, 7.1 million patient records were breached in 2013, a 137.7% increase over 2012.

And, the threat is getting broader. Once caused primarily by snooping or negligent employees, data breaches are now increasingly caused by cybercriminals who realize the potential financial value of medical records. Case in point: The Chinese hacker attack on the 206-hospital Community Health Systems which resulted in the breach of 4.5 million patient records, the second-largest HIPAA breach ever reported.

No physician practice should consider itself immune. While large hospital systems may be most attractive to hackers, Eric Perakslis, executive director of Harvard Medical School's Center for Biomedical Informatics, recently wrote in a New England Journal of Medicine article that 72 percent of cyberattacks have been aimed at hospitals, group practices and other provider organizations.

Perakslis recommends an "active learning approach” that involves real-time surveillance of emerging threats - and that includes an intimate knowledge of one's own network and vigilance at one's own practice. One of the most effective ways you can do this is to work with a company like ours who can help not only ensure security of your systems but also help teach you and your staff about common security issues.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 5th, 2014

GeneralHealthcare_Sep03_AThe Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is making it more difficult for physicians to prescribe opioids, and in doing so, has necessitated changes to e-prescribing.

The issue stems from titles II and III of the Comprehensive Substance Act (CSA), under which controlled substances are classified into one of five schedules based on potential for abuse and likelihood of dependence. The DEA has rescheduled hydrocodone-combination products (HCPs) from schedule III to schedule II in an attempt to curtail abuse and dependence.

But, the regulations around schedule II drugs are much more restrictive than those around schedule III drugs. There will be only two ways to prescribe HCPs after the rule change becomes effective October 6: with a paper-based prescription handed to the patient or e-prescribing. Any other means of prescribing, such as phone calls or faxes, are not allowed.

For e-prescribing, some changes may be necessary at the electronic medical record (EMR) level and at medical practices as well as at pharmacies. EMR vendors and practices will have to implement the security that's required by the DEA in regards to identity management and factor authentication. As for pharmacies, currently only about two-thirds are ready to receive electronic prescriptions of controlled substances; the others will have to make some changes.

If you are one of the practices that needs to make these changes in order to meet DEA requirements, contact us today to see how our systems can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 4th, 2014

Security_Sep02_AWith smartphones playing a larger role in today’s daily business, the need to recharge them while you are on the go increases. And when you’re nowhere near your charger, that public charging kiosk can look pretty promising. But what you might not know is that common traits in smartphone hardware and software design makes recharging phones through public chargers prone to juice jacking. If you're not sure what that is then let’s find out and also discover how you can avoid juice jacking too.

What’s juice jacking?

Regardless of the kind of smartphone you have, whether it’s an Android, iPhone or BlackBerry, there is one common feature across all phones: the power supply and the data stream pass over the same cable. This setup allows for juice jacking during the charging process whereby user access is gained on your phone by leveraging the USB data/power cable to illegitimately access your phone’s data and/or inject malicious code onto the device.

The attack can be as simple as an invasion of privacy, wherein your phone pairs with a computer concealed within the charging kiosk and information such as private photos and contact information are transferred to a malicious device. However, on the other hand, it can also be as invasive as an injection of malicious code directly into your phone. According to security researchers at this year’s Black Hat security conference, your iPhone can be compromised within one minute of being plugged into a harmful charger.

Exposure to a malicious kiosk can also create a lingering security problem even without the immediate injection of malicious code. Once a device is paired to a computer, it can access a host of personal information on the device, including your address book, notes, photos, music, sms database, typing cache, and even initiate a full backup of your phone, all of which can be accessed wirelessly at anytime.

How do I avoid it?

The most effective precautions center around simply not charging your phone using a third-party system. Here are some tips to help you avoid using public kiosk charger:
  • Keep your devices topped off: Make it a habit to charge your phone at your home and office when you’re not actively using it or are just sitting at your desk working.
  • Carry a personal charger: Chargers have become very small and portable, from USB cables to power banks. Get one and throw it in your bag so you can charge your phone anytime you’re at the office or while on-the-go if you use a power bank.
  • Carry a backup battery: If you’re not keen on bringing a spare charger or power bank, you can opt to carry a full spare battery if your device has a removable battery.
  • Lock your phone: When your phone is truly locked as in inaccessible without the input of a pin or equivalent passcode, your phone should not be able to be paired with the device it’s connected to.
  • Power the phone down: This technique only works on phones on a model-by-model basis as some phones will, despite being powered down, still power on the entire USB circuit and allow access to the flash storage in the device.
  • Use power only USB cables: These cables are missing the two wires necessary for data transmission and have only the two wires for power transmission remaining. They will charge your device, but data transfer is made impossible.
Even the tiniest detail like charging your phone from a kiosk charger could affect the security of your device. While there are many substitutes to using a third-party system, ultimately the best defense against a compromised mobile device is awareness. Looking to learn more about today’s security and threats? Contact us today and see how we can help.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Security
September 3rd, 2014

BCP_Sep02_AMany people wonder why it’s necessary to perform business impact analysis (BIA) when they’ve already invested a large amount of time on a risk assessment. The answer is simple: because the purpose of a BIA is different, and wrong results could incur unnecessary expenses or create inadequate business continuity strategies. To that end, let’s take a look at five tips for successful business impact analysis.

Five tips for successful business impact analysis:

  1. Treat it as a (mini) project: Define the person responsible for BIA implementation and their authority. You should also define the scope, objective, and time frame in which it should be implemented.
  2. Prepare a good questionnaire: A well structured questionnaire will save you a lot of time and will lead to more accurate results. For example: BS (British standard) 25999-1 and BS 2599902 standards will provide you with a fairly good idea about what your questionnaire should contain. Identifying impacts resulting from disruptions, determining how these vary over time, and identifying resources needed for recovery are often covered in this. It’s also good practice to use both qualitative and quantitative questions to identify impacts.
  3. Define clear criteria: If you’re planning for interviewees to answer questions by assigning values, for instance from one to five, be sure to explain exactly what each of the five marks mean. It’s not uncommon that the same event is evaluated as catastrophic by lower-level employees while top management personnel assess the same event as having a more moderate impact.
  4. Collect data through human interaction: The best way to collect data is when someone skilled in business continuity performs an interview with those responsible for critical activity. This way lots of unresolved questions are cleared up and well-balanced answers are achieved. If interviews are not feasible, do at least one workshop where all participants can ask everything that is concerning them. Avoid the shortcut of simply sending out questionnaires.
  5. Determine the recovery time objectives only after you have identified all the interdependencies: For example, through the questionnaire you might conclude that for critical activity A the maximum tolerable period of disruption is two days; however, the maximum tolerable period of disruption for critical activity B is one day and it cannot recover without the help of critical activity A. This means that the recovery time objective for A will be one day instead of two days.
More often than not, the results of BIA are unexpected and the recovery time objective is longer than it was initially thought. Still, it’s the most effective way to get you thinking and preparing for the issues that could strike your business. When you are carrying out BIA make sure you put in the effort and hours to do it right. Looking to learn more about business continuity? Contact us today.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 3rd, 2014

OSX_Sep02_AToday's operating systems offer a vast array of different features, some of which users find essential, and some that are deemed non-essential but are still handy. One such feature is the ability to take a screenshot. There is a good chance that you probably have taken screenshots before, but have you ever wished that there was a better way to take them? Here are four tips for better screenshots on OS X.

1. Know the shortcuts

As a Mac user, you likely know that the system is shortcut heavy. From navigating, to switching screens, to even opening programs, there is a shortcut for almost everything, including screenshots. With OS X there are a number of shortcuts associated with screenshots, and it is worthwhile knowing them:
  • Command + Shift + 3: Takes a screenshot of the entire screen.
  • Command + Ctrl + Shift + 3: Captures the entire screen and copies it to the clipboard. If you select Paste in a program like a word processor, it should paste the image.
  • Command + Shift + 4: Allows you to select the screenshot area and save it.
  • Command + Ctrl + Shift + 4: Allows you to select the screenshot area and copy it to the clipboard.
  • Command + Shift + 4 followed by spacebar: Captures an open window, folder, menu bar or desktop icon and saves it.
  • Command + Ctrl + Shift + 4 followed by spacebar: Captures an open window, folder, menu bar or desktop icon and copies it to the clipboard.
With Command + Shift + 4, you can also press and hold the spacebar once you have drawn a shape to move it around and select a different area. Also, pressing esc will cancel the screenshot selection if you have say selected too big of an area.

2. Including the cursor

Sometimes you may want to capture the mouse cursor pointing at something within a screenshot. You can do this by:
  1. Opening the Utilities folder on your computer. The quickest way to do this is to hit Command + Spacebar and typing Utilities.
  2. Scrolling down to the Grab app and opening it.
  3. Selecting Grab from the top right of your screen, followed by Preferences.
  4. Clicking on the cursor you would like to show up in your screenshots.
When you take the screenshot, the pointer will appear where you left it when the screenshot was taken.

3. Using Preview to take screenshots

If you have documents or files that contain images or text stored on your hard drive that you would like to take a screenshot of, the shortcuts will work fine, but did you know that you can use the Preview app to take screenshots as well?

If you right-click on the file that contains the information that you would like to take a screenshot of and select Open with followed by Preview, you will see the file open in preview mode. Clicking on File from the menu bar along the top followed by Take screenshot will allow you to capture the image.

When using this feature, you can select either:

  • From Selection… - Will allow you to draw a box to capture the screenshot.
  • From Window… - Will save the whole open window.
  • From Entire Screen… - Will capture the open window plus anything else on your screen.

4. Using the Grab app

Did you know that there is actually an app already installed on your computer that allows you to take screenshots? Most users rely on the shortcuts listed above, but these are actually related to the Grab app which is located in the Utilities folder.

If you open Grab (press Command + spacebar and type in 'Grab', select Grab under Applications), you can manually take screenshots using the app by:

  1. Clicking Capture.
  2. Selecting the type of screenshot from the drop-down menu.
The types of screenshot you can take with Grab include:
  1. Selection - Draw a box around the area of your screen you would like to capture.
  2. Window - Allows you to select a window to capture. Simply open the window and select Choose Window from the pop-up box.
  3. Screen - Will snap a screenshot of your entire screen.
  4. Timed Screen - Will start a timer then take an image of the screen in 10 seconds.
Looking to learn more about using OS X? Contact us today!
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Apple Mac OS
August 27th, 2014

socialmedia_Aug26_AHave you ever looked at images and visuals posted by businesses and users on Instagram? While many users take photos using their mobile devices, there are many images that simply look way too good to be taken with a phone camera, especially the ones without filters. Many business owners want to know how they too can take quality images like these too.

The truth behind some of Instagram's best images

Those awesome Instagram photos we see aren't always taken using mobile phones. Instead, many users use digital cameras which offer much better image quality. You can capture some amazing shots with a higher end DSLR cameras with multiple lenses.

If you have one of these cameras and are looking to create high-quality images for Instagram, or any other social media site, you may be slightly confused as to how to get the images onto the platform - especially since many of us use this via the mobile app. To make uploading a little easier, here is a brief guide detailing how to get images from your digital camera onto Instagram.

1. Transfer and process images

Once you have taken photos with your camera, you will need to get them off of your camera's memory and onto your computer's hard drive. Most camera's have apps that allow you to do this, so be sure to follow the instructions in the app that came with it.

When your images have been transferred to your computer, you are likely going to want to process them a little bit. This is especially true if you have a DSLR or other high-end point-and-shoot which takes RAW images. These can be quite large and are not compatible with Instagram.

Most images taken with a camera are quite large in size, so you are going to need to use an image editing program like Adobe Photoshop, or free tools like Pixlr to process them. What you are looking to do is to crop your images so that they are square.

If you are used to the advanced photo editing features, then do your edits before cropping. When you crop your images you should crop or resize them so that they are 640X640 pixels. This is the size of all images taken using Instagram's camera app.

Also, be sure to save the images as JPEGs, as this is the image format used by most smartphone cameras.

2. Save processed images in their own folder

It helps to create a folder somewhere on your hard drive (we recommend in the same folder where you save all of your other folders) that is specifically for images you want to post on Instagram.

When you have processed and edited the images to your liking, save the images here. Try using an easy to use file name like the date and a letter or note so you can easily tell which images are which, so you know which to use.

3. Move the images to your device

You can move images using the cloud or by manually transferring the images to your phone. If you decide to manually transfer your files, you will need to plug your device into your computer.

For users with iPhones, you can open iTunes and click on your device followed by Photos. Then select the box beside Sync photos from. Select the file you created in the step above and then Sync to transfer the images over.

For users with Android devices, plug your phone into the computer and drag the folder you created in the step above into the Photos folder of your Android device.

For Windows Phone users, plug your device into your computer and open My Computer on your desktop. You should see your device listed in the window that opens. Open the file system for your device and drag the image files you created above into the Photos folder of your phone.

If you choose to use the cloud to transfer your files, use the operating system's cloud (e.g., iCloud, Google Drive, or OneDrive) to upload the files. Just be sure to use the same account as the one on your phone.

4. Add images to Instagram

Once the photos are either on your device, or in the cloud, you can now upload them to Instagram. This can be done by:
  1. Opening the app and tapping on the camera icon.
  2. Tapping on the button in the bottom left of the screen.
  3. Selecting where the image is located on your device. E.g., the Gallery app if you placed the photos in your phone's hard drive, or the cloud service you used.
  4. Editing them as you see fit.
Once this is complete, you should be able to post your images as you usually do with any other Instagram image on your phone. Take the time to add filters, and hashtags as well as a good description before you post.

If you would like to learn more about using Instagram to share your images then get in touch and we will show you the advantages of the bigger picture.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Social Media